Tuesday, August 22, 2006

More jumping to conlusions...

I don't know what's up with the sudden trend of ascribing everying to miracles with the religious crowd, but it looks like a bunch of people in India have decided to start drinking sea water that mysteriously turned sweet.

Being the typically devoid of any critical analysis, this means that it must be god. It couldn't possibly be a natural cause of something making it taste sweet and even if it is, there's no way something sweet could be bad for you. Because anti-freeze isn't sweet or anything...

And it's simply impossible that something like this could be the case. Just ignore the fact that the beach "receives thousands of tonnes of raw sewage and industrial waste every day."

6 comments:

Srinivasa Ramanujam said...

Reports, from India, says recent heavy rains have added more fresh water to the saline sea water making it to taste sweet, atleast near the coast. Political leaders are asking people not to drink as it may be contaminated from industrial and other wastes. But who cares!?

Jon Voisey said...

Exactly. Never let the facts get in the way of faith.

mark_smith said...

Great blog just found it. Keep up the good work.

Anonymous said...

FYI, when the water in a natural body of water is described as sweet, this doesn't actually mean it tastes sugary. It just means it doesn't taste salty. It means it's freshwater. (Although honestly, "fresh" can be about as accurate as "sweet" in a lot of cases. Even in a river not brimming in raw sewage, there can be some nasty, nasty stuff.) It's a somewhat archaic useage in the US, but is still used elsewhere. "Sweet" water is obviously much sought after, since no matter how clean it might be, saltwater is absolutely no good for quenching thirst.

Anonymous said...

FYI, when the water in a natural body of water is described as sweet, this doesn't actually mean it tastes sugary. It just means it doesn't taste salty. It means it's freshwater. (Although honestly, "fresh" can be about as accurate as "sweet" in a lot of cases. Even in a river not brimming in raw sewage, there can be some nasty, nasty stuff.) It's a somewhat archaic useage in the US, but is still used elsewhere. "Sweet" water is obviously much sought after, since no matter how clean it might be, saltwater is absolutely no good for quenching thirst.

Srinivasa Ramanujam said...

Reports, from India, says recent heavy rains have added more fresh water to the saline sea water making it to taste sweet, atleast near the coast. Political leaders are asking people not to drink as it may be contaminated from industrial and other wastes. But who cares!?